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LEGO Ideas NASA Apollo Saturn V (21309) Officially Revealed

LEGO Ideas NASA Apollo Saturn V (21309)

LEGO has finally officially revealed the LEGO Ideas NASA Apollo Saturn V (21309). The set will consist of 1,969 pieces and retail for $119.99 and it stands at about 1 meter high (1:110 scale). This will be the largest LEGO Ideas set to date and will be available starting on June 1. Yes, it will come out the same day as the LEGO Creator Carousel (10257) which was announced yesterday.

If you didn’t notice, there’s one little Easter egg hidden in the piece count. As I mentioned above, it has 1,969 pieces and that number is also the year that the Apollo 11 landed the first humans on the moon with Neil Armstrong and pilot Buzz Aldrin.

LEGO Ideas NASA Apollo Saturn V (21309)

Make history with the LEGO® NASA Apollo Saturn V, the first rocket to put people on the Moon! Build the 3 stages of this stunning meter-high rocket and display it on the stand or launch into orbit. Offload the S-IC and S-II sections, dock the lunar lander with the command service module, and complete a successful Moon landing mission!

The set also includes 3 stands to display the model horizontally, 3 new-for-June-2017 astronaut microfigures for role-play recreations of the Moon landings, plus a booklet about the manned Apollo missions and the fan designers of this educational and inspirational LEGO Ideas set.

Felix and Valérie’s collaboration was guided by a shared passion for space exploration

Despite never meeting in person, space and LEGO fans Felix Stiessen and Valérie Roche beat the odds with their wonderfully brick built version of the iconic Apollo rocket. It was a collaboration that tested their skills in numerous ways but, as it turns out, the long-distance collaboration also proved to be a significant benefit to their project, as Felix states “there were often times when one of us abandoned the project for a few weeks and came back to it later; however, thanks to the fact that it is a collaborative project, it was always the case that one of us continued making progress on the project and re-motivated the other”.

Felix and Valérie’s collaborative spirit was tranferred to the LEGO design team as well, who took over the project once it was approved, in order to ensure it lived up to LEGO quality standards. Two designers, Michael Psiaki and Carl Thomas Mirriam, motivated by their enthusiasm for space, teamed up to bring the final model to life. “We were actually not asked. I was so excited when I heard that the project was potentially going to happen, and told Carl about it because I knew he was also a space fanatic. We decided it would be really cool to work together since it is such a big mode, so we approached the Ideas team about helping develop the product”, Michael said.

LEGO Apollo Saturn V Rocket Set 21309

Available June 1, 2017.
Ages 14+. 1,969 pieces.
$119.99 USD

Build the first rocket to land people on the Moon!

Display and role-play with this majestic meter-high LEGO® brick model of the NASA Apollo Saturn V. Packed with authentic details, it features 3 removable rocket stages, including the S-IVB third stage with the lunar lander and lunar orbiter. The set also includes 3 stands to display the model horizontally, 3 new-for-June-2017 astronaut microfigures for role-play recreations of the Moon landings, plus a booklet about the manned Apollo missions and the fan designers of this educational and inspirational LEGO Ideas set.

• Features a meter-high (approximately 1:110 scale) model of the NASA Apollo Saturn V with a removable S-IC first rocket stage with main rocket engine details, removable S-II second rocket stage with rocket engine details, removable S-IVB third rocket stage with the Apollo spacecraft and rescue rocket at top of the whole spacecraft, plus 3 stands to display the model horizontally.
• The Apollo spacecraft features the lunar lander and the lunar orbiter.
• Also includes 3 new-for-June-2017 astronaut microfigures.
• Great for display and role-playing the manned Apollo Moon missions.
• Includes a booklet about the manned Apollo Moon missions and the fan designers of this set.
• This set includes over 1,900 pieces.
• Measures over 39″ (100cm) high and 6” (17cm) in diameter.

LEGO Ideas NASA Apollo Saturn V (21309)

LEGO Ideas NASA Apollo Saturn V (21309)

LEGO Ideas NASA Apollo Saturn V (21309)

LEGO Ideas NASA Apollo Saturn V (21309)

LEGO Ideas NASA Apollo Saturn V (21309)

LEGO Ideas NASA Apollo Saturn V (21309)


  • Rob

    Looks cool and will probably buy it. I hate the micro figures though.

    • Reaven Veaceslav

      I think the point was to try and represent the sheer scale of the rocket. Regular figures still would have been far too large.

      If anything, it’s one of the best uses of a micro fig that I’ve seen.

      • Rob

        I’m not against why they used them, just not a fan of them.

      • Purple Dave

        Putting both in would have been a better call. For one thing, Collins probably never had, and certainly never wore, a full EVA suit during the mission. The two main components of the backpack alone weight a combined 125lbs, which is almost like sending a fourth crew member into space. He never landed on the moon, and there’s really no logical place to put the third nanofig on display.

        Additionally, there’s been some disgruntlement over the Women of NASA set. While the creator of Research Institute said her prime motivation was to encourage girls, the creator of Women of NASA has suggested that she basically wanted to “put little boys in their place”. So, not only is there some ugly motivation behind Women of NASA, and totally inaccurate representation of the third member of the Apollo 11 crew, but Women of NASA is currently set to be the _only_ set to have minifig representations of actual astronauts. I guarantee that they’re going to have to answer questions regarding the decision to omit minifigs of the actual Apollo 11 crew when two women from the minivan-era of the NASA program are about to be the only real-life astronauts to be immortalized as official minifigs. As of January, only six of the twelve people who have walked on the moon are still with us, and they range in age from 81-87 years old. It’d be a shame if we let the last of them die without seeing at least one of them as an official, regular minifig.

        • Reaven Veaceslav

          It probably won’t be that hard to explain because they can just say that they wanted the figs to be more in scale with this ship. Where would you put a full scale minifig in relation to this ship anyway? The only place they could go would be another display stand next to the rocket.

          The women of NASA set is unfortunate, but I don’t see how it affects this one. I’d rather they just changed the women of NASA set to be a set about random NASA astronauts.

  • Sid Dinsay

    Awesome model and an excellent price point. AND — 1,969 pieces. That must have been intentional (read: Apollo 11).

  • Ollie Davies

    I thought this was going to be a featureless length of white bricks. How foolish I was to doubt the Lego designers.

    • Purple Dave

      Oh, no, the Saturn series of rockets all had black blocks and stripes on a white rocket. It’s a design consideration that we actually inherited from WWII-era Germany. When developing their rockets for use in war, a black and white pattern made it easy for ground-based observers to determine if the rocket was rolling in flight. Since those same scientists played a critical roll in NASA’s space program, the idea came with them. During early launches it was determined that while the black blocks and stripes did help in ground-based observations, the black patches absorbed a lot of that Florida sun, causing dangerous temperature spikes in the massive load of fuel that filled maybe 90% of the total volume of the rocket. So, as time went on, the black portions were reduced in size, but they did last the entire run of the Saturn series of rockets. The same style of color scheme was inherited by the Titan series of rockets that is in use today. You can read more detail on this (and a link to an even more in-depth version of this article) here:

      http://www.popsci.com/why-was-saturn-v-black-and-white

      The new SLS rocket owes more to the STS “Space Shuttle” launch system’s color scheme. In 2011, when it was announced, the color scheme hailed back to the look we know from the Apollo missions, but as with the STS, they’ve decided to leave the orange insulation unpainted on the liquid fuel tank that comprises the bulk of the central portion of the SLS. The SRBs are actually longer versions of the ones used by the STS (five straight segments instead of four), so the new color scheme that was announced in 2015 _really_ sparks an image of the STS as seen from the side of the launch tower (so much so that you might wonder if the Shuttle is strapped to the other side). The reason the orange insulation is left unpainted is they determined the white paint used during the first two STS launches (probably based on Saturn series experience with the black color blocking) didn’t really contribute a lot to keeping heat in check, and the paint used to coat the entire bulk of the external fuel tank’s insulation added a whopping 600lbs. That’s probably more than the total weight of any single crew launched into space prior to STS-5! I think. STS-5 was the first mission of any space agency to carry a crew of four into space, and assuming the average weight of an astronaut is less than 200lbs but not lower than 150lbs, this should be true. Anyways, you can read more about the SLS color scheme changes here:

      http://www.collectspace.com//news/news-102215a-space-launch-system-design.html

      BTW, the pilot for STS-1 reported seeing “white stuff” coming off the external tank and splattering on the windshield. It’s believed that this was paint being shed by the spray-on insulation layer, which may have been another consideration in deciding to let the external fuel tanks fly naked.

  • Reaven Veaceslav

    Definitely going to get this. Fantastic price. Fantastic model. The only problem will be finding enough red technic pieces to make a launching platform.

  • Spontificus

    If I had the budget for larger sets, this would be at the top of my list. Great price, great model

  • Sid Dinsay

    Also: time to bust out some of those Classic Space crater baseplates for Eagle to land on.

  • Jon Houck

    Love it. In for multiple.

  • Jack Woodcock

    Shop At Home is showing a release date of May 22nd for the Carousel and June 1st for the Saturn.

  • The Anonymous Hutt

    Nobody complain about the price, it could be a lot higher.

    This looks like an awesome set overall! Too bad I like Lego Star Wars! xD

    • Sid Dinsay

      “Nobody complain about the price.” Exactly!

      • The Anonymous Hutt

        *looks at above comment*

        *looks at my own*

        *looks at above comment*

        Erm…due to previous encounters on this site, I’m not sure if that’s supposed to be witty humor, or a plain agreement…

        • Sid Dinsay

          Absolute agreement!!! 🙂

        • Reaven Veaceslav

          Yea this is a solid price point

  • Darth Shlomo

    This set is fantastic! Did anyone else notice it comes with 1,996 pieces? Apollo 11 launched in 1996!! That is a whole level of cool!!! 😀

  • Darth Shlomo

    Did anyone notice the piece count? 1969: the year Apollo 11 launched! :O

  • The Anonymous Hutt

    Is this the tallest Lego set of all time? I own the Tower of Orthanc, but that set is only 27″ tall. This is 36″.

    • Reaven Veaceslav

      The Eiffel Tower is 42.5 inches tall.

    • Reaven Veaceslav

      Also out of curiosity’s sake, the UCS Imperial Shuttle is 28 inches when displayed on its stand, which technically makes it taller than Orthanc. There’s also some pretty tall Technic sets if you count cranes with their booms fully extended.

  • TypoCorrecto

    Damn, this looks really good.

  • CadeSky

    This looks amazing!

  • Purple Dave

    It’s probably a good thing that they designed this to be displayed sideways in sections. At it’s full height, but without a launch tower, it would be incredibly unstable as a display piece, I can imagine it toppling over at the slightest bump. Displayed standing in sections, however, you lose the look of the full Saturn V rocket. Sideways, you get significantly greater stability, you can see the detail in the upper stage rockets, and you can still see something of the overall shape of the full rocket assembly. It looks like the stands keep the sections at the proper height so you’d be able to display it sideways with the sections all plugged into each other.

    That said, Collins probably wore a full suit with bubble helmet and gloves during launch and reentry, but he never went EVA. I doubt they packed an extra backpack or EVA helmet (launch helmets were mostly clear so you could get a good view in any direction, while EVA helmets had reflective visors that were designed to cut down on the dangerous, unfiltered solar rays. So, the inclusion of three identical nanofigs is inaccurate, as well as leaving no good place to display the third nanofig. Additionally, the command capsule colors are all wrong. I just looked at a picture of it after the water landing, and the outer surface is still mostly gold where the outer layer of heat shielding hadn’t burned away. Underneath it looks more like dark-orange or reddish-brown. The three inflatable balloons are actually white with thin gold stripes. The two larger balloons on port and starboard have a hexagon and pengagon pattern that looks like soccer ball. The smaller ventral balloon has longitude lines and what looks like a stylized representation of the command capsule orbiting Earth. Neither has enough gold in the pattern to make yellow look like the right choice of colors.