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The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908) Review

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

On to my reviews of some of the larger sets for The LEGO Batman Movie, my next review is The Scuttler (70908). The set contains 775 pieces and retails for $79.99. The contents of the box include seven numbered bags, a sticker sheet, and the instruction booklet.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

Minifigures

There are a whopping six minifigures in this set, Batman, the Joker, Poison Ivy, Commissioner Gordon, Barbara Gordon, and Dick Grayson.

Batman is pretty much the same minifigure as we’ve seen before. His facial expressions include and angry scowl and a disgusted expression. His accessories include two Batarangs.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The Joker has on the purple suit that we’ve seen before in other sets such as The Joker Battle Training (30523) polybag and The Joker Balloon Escape (70900). He also has on the long fabric coattail that goes between teh torso and the legs. His facial expressions include a smirk on one side and a nervous smile on the other. His accessory is a flag gun with “Bang!” stickers on either side.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

Poison Ivy is exclusive to this set in her usual green outfit. The torso has printing of her corset that is has leaves throughout. The forearms have printing for her gloves. The legs have more details of her outfit. In between the torso and legs is a fabric for the skirt. Poison Ivy has a double-sided head with both expressions being fairly neutral. Her red hairpiece is a very nice mold with a white flower on the side and green leaves on the back. Her accessories are a pair of green vines.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

For this version of Commissioner Gordon, he is in his formal outfit. The torso shows him in a blue jacket that is filled with medals and a red sash going across the chest and around back. The arms have printing of a badge shield with some gold bands around the wrists. The legs are plain blue. He has a double-sided head with happy and angry expressions. His hair piece is mostly dark gray with some white on the sides. His accessory is a revolver.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

Barbara Gordon is in her Gotham City Police Department tactical outfit. The torso is plain black while the legs have some printing for the kneepads. Over the torso is a protective vest with GCPD on both the front and back. Barbara has a double-sided head with a smirk on one side and an angry look on the other. She has a red ponytail as her hairpiece. She has no accessories.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

Finally, we have Dick Grayson who is in the light blue suit that was seen in the trailers. The torso has printing of the light blue jacket with metallic silver circles throughout. There’s also printing of his lavender colored shirt and dark blue cumberband. Dick has a normal double-sided head with a very happy expression on one side and quizzical expression on the other. The thing that stands out the most for Dick is the hair/glass piece. The glasses has printing for his eyes. He must have pretty thick glasses and bad eyesight to have the eyes that large on the glasses.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

Build

There are three builds to this set. The first part is Batman’s jetpack. The sides of it have some large thrusters and there’s a spot for Batman to stand on. Other than that, there’s not much going on here with this build.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

Next is what LEGO calls Poison Ivy’s vine monster. The base of it is a parabolic ring and there are brown vines used for the legs while some green vines are coming out from the back. It uses some trans-clear pieces to make it seem like it’s walking while also giving some stability to the build.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

Finally, the majority of the parts go to the Scuttler. The build is separated into little sections that created using each numbered bag. First, you build a majority of the cockpit and engine area which is set on a 6×12 plate. There isn’t that much going on except for stacking of bricks including ones with studs on the side for some detailing. The back part has a joint for the head later on.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The next part starts with some building for the body to give it some details. Next up, there is more parts to pretty much complete this part of the build. The rear engine/exhaust area uses a trans-black windscreen that has a caution sticker. Toward the front, there are some flex joints on either side for the arms later. The last thing for this bag is the net shoot which utilizes a jet engine with a net stuffed into it. You can fire the net using the droid head attached to a cross axle.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

Bag 3 is a fairly small bag that is used to start creating one of the arms. Again, there’s not much going on with it except for the SNOT building to give it a smooth look at the end. One notable thing is “The Scuttler”sticker on one of the cover pieces. The whole section then goes on the flex joints.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

Bag 4 has you adding a couple more flex joints to the rear. Next is a little section for part of the hind leg where there’s a joint at the knee. You then attach rest of the leg on to the joint. You do that for the other leg as well.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

Next are the two arms in the front of the Scuttler. There isn’t much going on here except for giving it some bulk for the shoulder areas. Again, they both attach to the flex joints and are held on by some pins. There’s also some tubing for the hydraulics of the arms.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The next bag are purely used to build the Scuttler’s front arms. There are some Technic bricks use to create the long arms with some teeth bars to slide up to the other section of the arm. To give it some more play feature, there’s also stud shooters attached.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The final bag bulks up more of the forearms a bit more as well as giving it some hands. The last of the parts are used to build the head of the Scuttler which is also the cockpit where there are a few stickers used for the computer consoles. To complete the look of the head, there are some angle plates for the ears. The section attaches to the joint in the middle of the body. Again, there are a couple of stud shooters on the sides of the head.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

Results

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908) is actually a pretty neat set. The look of it is great and it has to be one on of my favorite sets for the movie. There’s a lot of playability in it with the extendable arms to make it simulate it walking like a bat as well as the plethora of stud shooters and the net shooter. The minifigure selection is also great with the exclusive ones that you get with their alternative outfits. The price point is also pretty decent for what you get so overall I would recommend it, especially if you can get it on sale.

The LEGO Batman Movie The Scuttler (70908)

The Brick Fan Scoring Summary
Designwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Playabilitywww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Valuewww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Overallwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com


Check out my reviews of some other The LEGO Batman Movie sets:

The Mini Batmobile (30521)
The Joker Battle Training (30521)
Batman in the Phantom Zone (30522)
The Mini Batwing (30524)
The Joker Balloon Escape (70900)
Mr. Freeze Ice Attack (70901)
Catwoman Catcycle Chase (70902)
The Riddler Riddle Racer (70903)
Clayface Splat Attack (70904)
The Batmobile (70905)
The Joker Notorious Lowrider (70906)
Killer Croc Tail-Gator (70907)
Scarecrow Special Delivery (70910)
The Penguin Arctic Roller (70911)
The LEGO Batman Movie Collectible Minifigures (71017)
The LEGO Batman Movie Accessory Pack (5004930)

Thank you to LEGO AFOL Relations & Programs (ARP) team for sending in this set for me to review. The content above represents my own opinion and not the company. Review sets sent in does not guarantee a positive review.


  • Bongo Beans

    I got this on Ebay without the minifigures for less than half the price and must say it is fabulous – if you like zoids you’ll like this and It has inspired me to build some mechs – very very nice!

  • BricksByMark

    I really like your reviews. But the photos on all of your reviews are so dark. I think you need to consider better lighting. A simple desk lamp with a paper filter over the bulb would do the trick.

    • The Anonymous Hutt

      How could you possibly call these photos dark? The photos look fine, and I can always see everything very clearly in the reviews.

  • Purple Dave

    I’m surprised that the front “claws” are mounted by twin ball-joints, because linking two of them together like that makes them function essentially like finger hinges. Easier all around to just put in click hinges.

    Also, I could swear I read somewhere that this Barbara came with a Harvard for Police SWAT vest, but I just opened one yesterday and got a standard GCPD vest, which is what’s shown in the official PR photo.

  • The Anonymous Hutt

    No, this didn’t really help. While I can see a slight difference in brightness, the picture you posted seems a little…too bright? It seems more blurry that the Brick Fan one.

    I stand by the fact that I have never been unable to see the content in a photo on The Brick Fan.

  • Purple Dave

    Some of the issues you cite are not the result of lighting, but of white balance. The background on Gordon is washed out enough that there’s clearly a lot of light, and that’s causing the camera to overcompensate.

    The lighting of the twin-pack Batsuit minifigs you posted has a very soft focus, so that might have been done using a very expensive lighting setup. Professional photographers will often actually light away from the subject and then use special umbrella-like reflectors to direct it back at the subject so the light comes in from lots of different angles instead of just one. Alternately, they might use screens of fabric to scatter direct lighting. Based on the shadows on his Disco Batman’s legs, I’m guessing Alan is using direct lighting.

    However, while Alan’s photos aren’t the best I’ve ever seen, they’re not nearly as bad as you’re suggesting. They’re actually a lot better than some of the photos I used to post when I ran a LEGO news site (mine were largely due to the poor quality of the camera I had at the time, which had serious problems with some of the official LEGO colors). Helped a bit by the fact that I’d actually studied theatrical lighting design in college, I did eventually nail down a lighting setup that worked for me without breaking the bank. I used three clip-on study lights that I could move around a bit to eliminate bad glare before even taking a photo. I found bulbs that I’m sure aren’t even made anymore, which had a thick, fibrous coating applied to the top of the bulb that softened the light without any need for those reflector umbrellas or fabric screens. Figuring out where to place them was the biggest challenge, but eventually I ended up with two of them at the same height as the subject but aimed 45⁰ from left and right. The third was mounted directly in front of the subject but aimed down at a 45⁰ angle. Using light sources that were aimed a bit from the side prevented the flat lighting so you could still see the 3D shape of the subjects. Using three light sources that were spread out a bit eliminated hard shadows because any shadow caused by one light was usually lit by the other two.

    But my camera still had problems with white balance. You could tell that was the problem because the color of the background would change predictably based on the color of the subject I was photographing.

    • BricksByMark

      Hey Dave. Great and super analysis of the difficulties of photographing Lego! At least it doesn’t move, like insects etc!

      Just a point of order on this though: “they’re not nearly as bad as you are suggesting.” I never ranked these photos against anything else, didn’t say they were terrible. I just said they were dark, which from you have said here, seems you agree with me 🙂

      I actually agree entirely with your comment “Alan’s photos aren’t the best I’ve ever seen”. This was my first and only point. Light umbrellas etc are indeed expensive as you say. Which is why my first suggestion was a light with white paper over it. That should be all that’s needed but you can spend thousands on lighting/photography if you can or want, but I think for something like this you can get by with the basics.