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LEGO Marvel Super Heroes SDCC 2017 Deadpool Duck Review

LEGO Marvel Super Heroes SDCC 2017 Deadpool Duck

It wasn’t announced until Preview Night of San Diego Comic Con 2017 but I have managed to get the exclusive LEGO Marvel Super Heroes Deadpool Duck. He is basically what happens when Deadpool is combined with Howard the Duck which was first introduced in a five issue miniseries at the beginning of the year. The clamshell that Deadpool Duck uses is the same one as before in previous years. The backing is just a two-sided one with the back promoting LEGO Marvel Super Heroes 2.

LEGO Marvel Super Heroes SDCC 2017 Deadpool Duck

The torso is a new one with updated printing. There are now straps that go around the shoulders and around the back. There’s also some brown pouches around the waist as well. The Deadpool buckle is a little bit larger. The legs are of the short variety as he is a duck. The head gets a makeover which uses the Donald and Daisy head mold from the LEGO Collectible Minifigures Disney Series (71012). The head is now painted with the red and black Deadpool mask with one eye squinting.

LEGO Marvel Super Heroes SDCC 2017 Deadpool Duck

Overall, the exclusive SDCC 2017 LEGO Marvel Super Heroes Deadpool Duck is a great addition to any collection. Considering Deadpool hasn’t appeared in a set since 2013 with the Wolverine’s Chopper Showdown (6866), any variant of him is a good. Unfortunately for fans who weren’t able to attend SDCC, the only way to possibly get it is having really good friends or on the secondary market. The price of it has dropped somewhat since SDCC ended but it’s still one of the more expensive exclusive LEGO minifigures.

LEGO Marvel Super Heroes SDCC 2017 Deadpool Duck

To tell you about the process of how I got Deadpool Duck, I didn’t try for him on Thursday mainly because of what happened last year at SDCC. Basically, my press badge wouldn’t allow me to get him although it didn’t specifically say that press couldn’t do it. I assumed that this year would be the same until I found out that I could try for it. As a result, I had to wait until Saturday to try for it. Luckily the iPad gods were generous enough to give me the green Good Cop sign and I managed to walk away with it. Right after, I walked out of the line, there were a number of scalpers waiting to buy them off of people by offering $100 for it just so they can flip it a few seconds later on eBay. Like I’ve said many times before, time is the most important thing at SDCC. If you guys want to know, I waited in line for three plus hours with my group for a chance to win this so I got pretty lucky.

LEGO Marvel Super Heroes SDCC 2017 Deadpool Duck


  • moseph

    Congrats !! It’s a very interesting minifigure.

  • Gomek

    I’m still not sure why even SDCC fans would support these things*. Is having something just because no one else has it, really that important? You really wouldn’t rather just get an unlimited $5 poly bag version and enjoy your time at the convention?

    Also if I may soapbox for a second (longer)….

    My big issue is, this is NOT a practice meant to serve collectors. It is meant to EXPLOIT collectors.

    When comics, and later toys, became seen as collectable, manufactures
    started to try to take advantage of the collectors market. They introduced
    artificial rarity as a means to manipulate the market in their favor. Lego has now gotten caught up in this as well (and the fact that they are not directly making money on it is irrelevant). They are trying to boost the perceived value of their product by producing items in numbers well under the market demand. Why anyone would support this is beyond me.

    Also.. in an earlier thread I misjudged the amount of time this was going to result in knock-offs hitting the market. They are already being listed on ebay for $3.

    (*with full understanding that being lucky enough to get one, or reporting on it, is not the same thing as supporting the practice. I appreciate what I perceive to be neutral reporting here.)

    • Reaven Veaceslav

      Well, on my end, my knockoff is already on the way. I’m not a huge fan of buying knockoffs, but it’d barely be within my budget to buy the real thing.

    • Jessica Jones

      Not exploiting collectors. You don’t even need to collect these. It’s all about giving fans at the con something exclusive to the fun and giving them an experience that’s true to the spirit of Comic-Con: waiting in long lines for something not many people get.

      I’ve met so many friends in line for this. We have an entire network of people now and we all help each other out. I brought my friends from school and got them in line and they both got figures. They won’t sell them, that’s not what it was about. It was about giving them a true comic-con experience for the first time. They loved it. Because the truth is, it’s not about the figure. I mean, we choose to do it because they’re figures that appeal to us, not some generic figure with an SDCC shirt. None of us want that. It wouldn’t even be worth getting in line for. But it isn’t about the figure, it’s about waiting in line, meeting friends, and all of that. Even if you don’t get the figure, you come out with something. It’s a great experience and if you were at the Con, you’d see why.

      • Reaven Veaceslav

        If it’s not about the figure, then can we have it too? I’d really like this one, to be honest. I’ve enjoyed this particular series. Maybe instead of exclusive figures and arbitrarily making people wait in lines for hours, they could provide more ‘actual’ entertainment and value for being there, instead of hiding the fact that there’s very little to do behind hours of mandatory waiting just to get to that tiny amount of substance. It sounds like these lines are a way to corral people and keep them occupied in an organized fashion for extensive periods of time, so that no one is doing anything and you’re unable to go experience what other companies or shows have to offer.

        I’ve been to cons, and personally never felt any drive to stand in a line for 3 hours to get a bit of plastic that would be just as easily sold online for 5$. I’d rather be, you know, doing stuff at a con. Which is another reason I rarely go to any, because the number of lines is very prohibitive to me actually doing anything. I like smaller, more local festivals with fewer people and more ability to get around.

        • Jessica Jones

          Doing stuff at this con is either waiting in line (for a panel at Hall H is 2 days), walking the floor to get free stuff until you’re tired and want to sit down and wait a bit, or getting in lines for exclusives. There’s so much to do here, it’s insane.

          As someone who attends both SDCC and “normal” conventions like WonderCon, SDCC is absolutely in a league of its own. If you ever get here, you’re absolutely gonna want to stand in lines and do what all the people here do.

          • Reaven Veaceslav

            “2 days”

            It’s amazing what people have convinced themselves represents an exciting experience. Maybe I’m just missing the sense of community or something.

          • Jessica Jones

            You very much are. Me and my friends, we’ve got ourselves a little “network” to be at the right place at the right time to get what we want. Typically when you do Hall H, you do it with a group so you can step out of line for a bit and take turns walking the floor.

          • Purple Dave

            Many of the people at SDCC are probably allergic to soap and water, so two days parked in line with each other isn’t as big a deal as it sounds like it should be.

          • Jessica Jones

            God people in Hall H line were so gross. Me and my friends walked like thirty to forty feet away from them along the sidewalk (they were on the grass) and it reeked.

            Most people in my network had a sense of personal hygiene. That’s why they had to network.

      • Gomek

        Sorry, when a company purposely under produces an item to drive value, that’s exploitation of the fan base. I’m not sure there’s much room for interpretation there.

        You want to give fans on line something? Give them gift
        certificates or preview figures.

        And of course you don’t want a figure with a SDCC shirt. Why would you want a limited edition figure about, and for, the convention. You want something with mass appeal so you get to have something that other people
        want. It makes you feel special. And what’s worse, is that there are real fans of these characters who don’t get them. You know, the people who these should actually be for. If even half the people on line at SDCC even knew who Steve Gerber was I would be shocked. Like really shocked.

        It is nothing BUT exploitation, and because you’re benefiting, you can’t seem to see that. Whether or not you had fun getting your “Legos” is not the point. It’s not all about you. There are real fans of these properties who now have to choose between getting gouged on Ebay or getting told they are not privileged enough to get something that should run them $4.28 including tax. And you having fun is not justification for that.

        • Jessica Jones

          It is justification. As long as people at the Con keep having fun and more people at the Con keep coming to it (the line almost always go down to Seaport Village from the Convention Center. It’s popular there, people enjoy doing it, it’s not going to change. You can trust in that.

          • Reaven Veaceslav

            Yea but if the figure were sold mass market, you and me could get it 🙂

          • Jessica Jones

            But then we at the convention would be deprived of the experience of getting an exclusive figure at the con. 🙂

            Look, if it comes out later in a set, great. But exclusive figures like this are some of what makes this con so special.

          • Reaven Veaceslav

            Seems sorta shallow if the main enjoyment you’re getting is due to an object other people can’t have, but I’ve never really had a collector attitude about this stuff

          • Jessica Jones

            It’s not special because other people can’t have it, it’s special because we want it and this is the only place we can get it.

          • Reaven Veaceslav

            That’s an identical concept. It’s special because it’s a limited run item, and only you have access to it, not anyone else. The basis of it being important is sheer rarity and desirability of the item, not the actual value of said item, since it is, of course, just a bit of molded plastic.

          • Jessica Jones

            I don’t find joy in knowing other people can’t have a figure they, for some reason, feel entitled to owning. I do find joy in waiting in line for the figure I know I can only find at this certain place, and I enjoy attending the event each year, despite knowing not everyone can be here, not because of it. But because I was there and because I know it was an exclusive I enjoyed waiting in line and getting it.

          • Gomek

            You literally just wrote that you don’t find joy in excluding others, and followed it up by saying you enjoy these being exclusive.

          • Jessica Jones

            Trust me, I don’t feel happy that you didn’t get it. I almost wish you were there, where you could get it.

    • Reaven Veaceslav

      This reminds me of the way Nintendo handles, well, everything. The Switch is still perpetually understocked and will never be in stock because Nintendo knows that limiting access makes people want it more. Several months after launch, and Breath of the Wild was more well sold than actual Switches because people couldn’t actually buy the console, but obviously wanted to get one.

      When the NES classic kept running out of stock and people asked Nintendo to make more, Nintendo’s official response was basically “we’ve heard your feedback, and you’ll be glad to know we’ve stopped production of the product everyone has been begging us to make more of.”

      Nintendo managed to turn DLC into a collector market because you have to buy physical toys, of which there are a limited quantity, to play DLC content. I can only imagine what someone in 20 years is going to do when they want to play their childhood games but because there’s no physical figures anymore, they can’t actually access a lot of the content.

    • Purple Dave

      You’re sorta right, except they aren’t even actually benefiting from their actions. Many of the big convention collectibles are produced in large enough quantities that pretty much anyone who shows up can get one if they want it, and leftovers are sold off through sites like Entertainment Earth or stores like TRU. And if you want them at the convention, you still have to pay for them (that’s the part where they make money off of these exclusives)

      On the retail side, I know that both the Spawn and Star Trek action figure lines went from being very popular money-makers to basically tanking overnight due to stuff like Malebolgia and the 1701 series making it pretty much impossible for the average fan to field a complete collection.

      If this was primarily aimed at a traditional adult market, I suspect the whole Superheroes lineup would have fallen apart by now. Kids rarely get to own an entire theme, though, so for them it’s not much different than, say, the full range of The LEGO Batman Movie costing over $1000 (and counting!). For AFOLs, on the other hand, being complete in their favorite themes is kind of a big deal, and those who can actually afford to drop several hundred dollars each year to pick up a minifig or two may not actually have a problem with these. For the rest, they aren’t making anything on these minifigs (in fact, they’re spending _a_lot_ to give them away), but they’ve probably convinced a lot of people to scale back their purchases from one of everything to just the sets they really care about (and Bricklink any characters they really want but not enough to buy the whole set). Or they’re just buying Chinese bootlegs.

      • Gomek

        I definitely remember the Star Trek Playmates debacle. I’ve never scene a line of toys die such a quick death. And yeah, I definitely wasn’t trying to say artificial rareity is/was a good strategy.

  • Derak

    Glad to hear you got one! This was my 16th consecutive SDCC and Lego has gone through many changes in that time.
    I waited on Thursday and lost to the iPad, but my dad got one. We also waited on Saturday and that was by far the worst the line has ever been in all of the years. Usually you can get in line around 10am and have a great chance of getting to the iPad. We got in line at 9:15 on Sat and they were down to the last box by the time we got up there.
    We got really lucky and my dad and I each got one on Sat.
    I have to agree with you Gomek, I don’t think Lego is serving the community very well with how they do these. The frenzy would almost be the same for any other freebie (non-exclusive) they gave out. People go nuts for anything free there. The line might be a bit smaller with less flippers going through, which would also make the Lego fans happier.

    • Jessica Jones

      That’s weird…. I don’t know what time I got in line, but I think it was after 9 and I got one…. me and my whole group did. I’d already gotten one on Thurs tho. The people in front of us were trying to flip them which was annoying and someone in line paid someone in my group $200 and was gonna buy another for $200.

      • Derak

        Haha, it sounds like you didn’t even read what I wrote. There’s nothing weird about it. If you got in line just after 9am, as I said I did, then you would have saw how few they had left. I wasn’t saying we go their last two, but every win shrunk what was left and any one coming up to the last zig-zagging line would get nervous about how few were left. I didn’t have an issue with selling my extra on eBay for over $250, but that doesn’t mean I agree with exclusivity. I wouldn’t be bummed at all if they switched to a non exclusive. I would still get in line and I wouldn’t feel my con experience was diminished at all. But then again, I’ve gone to hundreds of conventions in the last two decades so I’ve been through all of the evolving changes.

        • Jessica Jones

          No, I read what you wrote. Did you read what I wrote? I don’t know what time I got in line on sat is what I’m saying, but I feel like it was after 9. It might not have been, tho, but if it was that’d have been weird.

          Now that I’m thinking about it it was probably much sooner. We were by the closest of the mariott bathrooms to the con. How far back was the like for you when you got in?

          • Derak

            I still don’t get what is weird about it? How close we may have been? We were right in front of the second bathrooms.

  • Matt Bailey

    Congrats on getting one! IMO it’s the best one next to Batman Zur En Arrh from a couple years ago. The more obscure the better to me!

    • Purple Dave

      In terms of a general minifig, the 2011 Batman is still the best. The two Dark Knight costumes they released in 2008 and 2013 are a mix of dark-bley and black, which really doesn’t work for Bale’s costume. SDCC gave us the only really great TDK/TDKR Batman. While the UCS Tumbler came with TDK Joker, the Batman costume was a very different design from Batman Begins.

      Zur-En-Arrh may seem like a perfect subject for these because there will be less demand for him than, say, Jean Grey, but consider the reaction to the TLBM theme. All of those wacky Z-grade villains that most people have never heard of are the most popular part of the entire theme. Zur-En-Arrh would have been a hit in TLBM.

      So major characters like Bizarro, Jean Grey, Green Lantern, and Captain Marvel were all lousy picks because people would gladly buy large sets to get them…and they couldn’t. Alt costumes like black Superman, black Spiderman, and so on are also bad picks because they’re very popular characters and there are a lot of people who’ll want to collect every version…and they can’t. But go too obscure and nobody will even care about them. Not that it really matters because…did I mention that it actually costs them a bunch of money to give these away?

      • Gomek

        Black suit Spider-man was particularly bad for me, because that was the Spider-man I had in the mid 80’s. That was my Spider-man. To be ‘excluded’ from that was all sorts of wrong.

  • JDrew33

    Do we have any idea about how many of these are distributed? Is it 500? 1000? 250?

    • I actually don’t know the count.